Hopurangi, Brian Flintoff
Hopurangi, Brian Flintoff
Hopurangi, Brian Flintoff
Hopurangi, Brian Flintoff

Hopurangi, Brian Flintoff

Regular price $200.00 Sale

The Hopurangi or Song catcher is adapted from larger Poiawhiowhio. It is carved with the face of Hine pu te hue, the godess who, at the time of creation, ook within her body the anger of the others. When worn the Hopurangi sees all that happens around us but when the cord is unfastened and it is slowly swung it only sings of the peaceful things of the day.

In Maori cosmogony a story tells of the God singing the universe into existence. Thus music is important and so special that traditionally, it needed a reason to be performed.
The reasons for the existence of all the instruments is part of Maori mythology and the instruments are perceived as families descended from children of the Gods.
Mythology tells how the primal parents Rangi and Papa, the Sky Father and Earth Mother were for ages in close embrace with their children cramped between them. Eventually the children, led by Tane, forced them apart and then had to set about creating order in their new expanded world. Firstly they clothed the sky with ever changing clouds and slow moving stars and the earth was clothed with plants to give beauty and birds to add song.

Find out more with Taonga Puoro: Singing Treasures.

Brian Flintoff 

Brian Flintoff is a master bone-carver, whose work is held on marae through Aotearoa and in private and public collections and museums throughout the world. He has been carving for over 35 years, and has been most influenced in his work by traditional Maori artists, as well as artists from other indigenous cultures, especially that of the West Coast Canadian Indian tribes. He is the author of Taonga Puoro: Singing Treasures, about the musical instruments of the Maori, and Brian is also widely regarded as one of Aotearoa’s pre-eminent makers of Maori instruments. He works from his home studio in Nelson.